Nigeria shuts down three international airports

    0
    3
    File Photo

    Nigeria has shut three of its five international airports to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

    The Presidential Task Force on COVID-19, Friday, announced the closure of the three international airports as part of measures taken to combat the spread of coronavirus.

    The chairman of the task force and Secretary to the Government of the Federation (SGF), Boss Mustapha, stated that effective from Saturday, the Mallam Aminu Kano International Airport, Kano; Akanu Ibiam International Airport, Enugu and the Port-Harcourt International Airport, Omagwa, will be closed to all international flights.

    However, Nigeria’s two main international airports will remain open and “accept international flights irrespective of the type of operations,” Willie Bassey, the Director (Information) in the SGF’s office said.

    These are the Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport, Abuja and the Murtala Muhammed International Airport, Lagos will remain opened to and accept international flights irrespective of the type of operations.

    “All stakeholders are enjoined to collaborate with Port Health Services in the identification of suspects/persons at points of entry and to bring such persons to the attention of Port Health Officers for appropriate action,” he said.

    Mr Bassey said the task force “urges all Nigerians to remain calm and cooperate with the instructions already issued by the Nigerian Supreme Council for Islamic Affairs (NSCIA) and Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN) on modes of worship and gatherings at this time not exceeding fifty (50) persons.

    “The PTF assures Nigerians that adequate and appropriate information will be made available in due course,” he said.

    Nigeria has confirmed 12 cases of the COVID-19, one of whom has fully recovered. No person has died of the disease in Nigeria.

    The virus has caused over 10,000 deaths globally and infected over 100,000 people.

    Get more stories like this on Twitter

    (The Nation)